Tag Archives: WaHiInwood

Morris Jumel’s “Handwriting the Constitution” Community Event Series

What does the U.S. Constitution actually say? On January 20, 2017, artist Morgan O’Hara took a pen and paper to the central branch of the New York Public Library and began to write her own copy of the document in long hand in what she describes as “a form of protest for introverts.” Since then, there have been some 119 sessions on three different continents and more than 2,000 participants.

Morgan says: “This art practice was created so that people will know their rights, deepen their understanding of laws created to protect these rights, and helps resist negative thinking….The goal of this art practice is to encourage people to hold their own Handwriting sessions on a recurring basis; to create a physical and psychological space that explores the practice of concentrated writing as an art form, and a process designed to bring people together in a quiet and calming way, all by focusing on human rights.”

This summer, we will be hosting the first online version of the Handwriting Project, collaborating with the Old Stone House and other Historic House Trustsites in New York City, as well as a community of artists in Europe. We will meet every Thursday from 12 pm – 2 pm beginning on August 13 and ending on September 17, with a special session on Wednesday, August 26 to observe the Centennial of Ratification of the 19th Amendment and women’s right to vote. Commit to spending time with the U. S. Constitution, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, or choose another document. Participation is casual and members will have the opportunity to share their documents.

Fort Tryon Park’s ’85 Years of the Heather Garden: Building on The Olmsted Brothers Legacy’

Join an online workshop with Public Garden Designer Ronda Brands and travel through the 8+ decades of the Heather Garden’s evolving landscape. Starting with the Olmsted Brothers planting plan for John D. Rockefeller, Jr. in the 1930s, through the 1950s, into the fiscal crisis of the 1970s and beyond into the present day. Learn which plants were selected for placement in the Heather Garden and the planning decisions involved; and how increased knowledge of invasive species and a desire for year-round interest, color, and contrast helped the garden evolve into a world-class horticultural destination.

RSVP for Zoom Link.

Morris Jumel’s “Handwriting the Constitution” Community Event Series

What does the U.S. Constitution actually say? On January 20, 2017, artist Morgan O’Hara took a pen and paper to the central branch of the New York Public Library and began to write her own copy of the document in long hand in what she describes as “a form of protest for introverts.” Since then, there have been some 119 sessions on three different continents and more than 2,000 participants.

Morgan says: “This art practice was created so that people will know their rights, deepen their understanding of laws created to protect these rights, and helps resist negative thinking….The goal of this art practice is to encourage people to hold their own Handwriting sessions on a recurring basis; to create a physical and psychological space that explores the practice of concentrated writing as an art form, and a process designed to bring people together in a quiet and calming way, all by focusing on human rights.”

This summer, we will be hosting the first online version of the Handwriting Project, collaborating with the Old Stone House and other Historic House Trustsites in New York City, as well as a community of artists in Europe. We will meet every Thursday from 12 pm – 2 pm beginning on August 13 and ending on September 17, with a special session on Wednesday, August 26 to observe the Centennial of Ratification of the 19th Amendment and women’s right to vote. Commit to spending time with the U. S. Constitution, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, or choose another document. Participation is casual and members will have the opportunity to share their documents.

Morris Jumel’s “Handwriting the Constitution” Community Event Series

What does the U.S. Constitution actually say? On January 20, 2017, artist Morgan O’Hara took a pen and paper to the central branch of the New York Public Library and began to write her own copy of the document in long hand in what she describes as “a form of protest for introverts.” Since then, there have been some 119 sessions on three different continents and more than 2,000 participants.

Morgan says: “This art practice was created so that people will know their rights, deepen their understanding of laws created to protect these rights, and helps resist negative thinking….The goal of this art practice is to encourage people to hold their own Handwriting sessions on a recurring basis; to create a physical and psychological space that explores the practice of concentrated writing as an art form, and a process designed to bring people together in a quiet and calming way, all by focusing on human rights.”

This summer, we will be hosting the first online version of the Handwriting Project, collaborating with the Old Stone House and other Historic House Trustsites in New York City, as well as a community of artists in Europe. We will meet every Thursday from 12 pm – 2 pm beginning on August 13 and ending on September 17, with a special session on Wednesday, August 26 to observe the Centennial of Ratification of the 19th Amendment and women’s right to vote. Commit to spending time with the U. S. Constitution, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, or choose another document. Participation is casual and members will have the opportunity to share their documents.

Friends of Inwood Hill Park Free Summer Programs: Nature Photography, SENIORS

TUESDAYS 9:30 – 11:00 AM SENIORS.

Create compelling digital Nature photography. Participants will gain in-depth knowledge of shooting techniques, and shot composition. No photography experience necessary!

Reserve your spot in advance by joining our mailing list. Email margaret.knoerzer@parks.nyc.gov to be added! Limited spots will be available to walk-ins, all photography classes are capped at 10 participants. All participants will be required to wear a mask and practice social distancing. All classes will meet at the Muscota Marsh.