Tag Archives: The Cloisters

Exhibition Tour—The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy at The Met Cloisters

A cache of jeweled rings, brooches & coins, the precious possessions of a Jewish family of medieval Alsace, was hidden in the 14th century in the wall of a house in Colmar, France. Discovered in 1863 and on view in this exhibition at The Met Cloisters, the Colmar Treasure revives the memory of a once-thriving Jewish community that was scapegoated and put to death when the Plague struck the region with devastating ferocity in 1348–49.

Discoveries—Word and Image at The Met Cloisters (Ages 18 and above)

This workshop for adults with learning or developmental disabilities and accompanying friends and family members includes a gallery tour and art activity. Free; reservations are required. Contact 212-650-2010 or access@metmuseum.org. Learn about resources and tips for visiting the Museum.

Discoveries—Word and Image at The Met Cloisters (Ages 5–17)

This workshop for children with learning or developmental disabilities and accompanying friends and family members includes a gallery tour and art activity. Free; reservations are required. Contact 212-650-2010 or access@metmuseum.org. Learn about resources and tips for visiting the Museum.

‘Met Escapes’ Gallery Tour at The Cloisters: Word and Image

Individuals living with dementia, together with their family members or care partners, participate in discussions, handling sessions, art making, and other interactive and multisensory activities in the galleries. Meet in the Main Hall at The Met Cloisters. Free; reservations are required. Contact 212-650-2010 or access@metmuseum.org.

The Cloisters

The Cloisters museum and gardens, the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe, was assembled from architectural elements, both domestic and religious, that largely date from the twelfth through the fifteenth century.

The building and its cloistered gardens—located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan—are treasures in themselves, effectively part of the collection housed there. The Cloisters’ collection comprises approximately two thousand works of art.

Visit The Cloisters