Tag Archives: Local History

Monthly Curator Tours of “Home Plate” at Morris Jumel Mansion

Join exhibition curator, Neil Scherer of Going, Going, Gone Sports on a one-hour specialized tour of the exhibition, “Home Plate,” which features iconic moments from the Polo Grounds stadium.

Since its construction in 1765, the Morris-Jumel Mansion has witnessed countless changes to the property and built environment. The original estate stretched from the Hudson to Harlem Rivers before being sold in parcels at various points throughout the 19th century and incorporated in the city grid. In 1890, the third incarnation of the Polo Grounds rose within the gaze of the Mansion on former riverfront property where the Morris’ and Jumels’ harvested oysters.

The iconic bathtub shaped stadium at the Polo Grounds served as home to the New York Giants baseball team from 1891-1957, the New York Yankees from 1913-22, the New York Giants football team from 1925-55, New York Mets from 1962-1963, as well as other professional teams and athletic events. This property, which lies east of the Mansion, just below Coogan’s Bluff, lays claim to some of the most exciting moments in American sports history. The exhibition will explore and celebrate those teams, players, and personalities that solidified the stadium as a New York icon and famed venue where local and national heroes cemented their reputations and legacies.

Included in the exhibition are extraordinarily rare autographs, tickets, photos, programs, and other ephemera that serves to commemorate the ghosts of this legendary New York athletic pantheon.

$15/$10 Museum Members.

Monthly Curator Tours of “Home Plate” at Morris Jumel Mansion

Join exhibition curator, Neil Scherer of Going, Going, Gone Sports on a one-hour specialized tour of the exhibition, “Home Plate,” which features iconic moments from the Polo Grounds stadium.

Since its construction in 1765, the Morris-Jumel Mansion has witnessed countless changes to the property and built environment. The original estate stretched from the Hudson to Harlem Rivers before being sold in parcels at various points throughout the 19th century and incorporated in the city grid. In 1890, the third incarnation of the Polo Grounds rose within the gaze of the Mansion on former riverfront property where the Morris’ and Jumels’ harvested oysters.

The iconic bathtub shaped stadium at the Polo Grounds served as home to the New York Giants baseball team from 1891-1957, the New York Yankees from 1913-22, the New York Giants football team from 1925-55, New York Mets from 1962-1963, as well as other professional teams and athletic events. This property, which lies east of the Mansion, just below Coogan’s Bluff, lays claim to some of the most exciting moments in American sports history. The exhibition will explore and celebrate those teams, players, and personalities that solidified the stadium as a New York icon and famed venue where local and national heroes cemented their reputations and legacies.

Included in the exhibition are extraordinarily rare autographs, tickets, photos, programs, and other ephemera that serves to commemorate the ghosts of this legendary New York athletic pantheon.

$15/$10 Museum Members.

Dyckman Farmhouse Hosts Community Conversation at Inwood Public Library

Dyckman Farmhouse Museum will host a community panel, at the auditorium in the Inwood branch of the New York Public Library, on its project, DyckmanDISCOVERED, which will illuminate the narrative of the enslaved and freed peoples who lived and worked on the farm and throughout, what is now, Inwood. Come listen to expert researchers and historians discuss their work and give your input on what you would like to know more about. After the conversation concludes, we invite you to visit the Dyckman Farmhouse to take a fresh look at the exhibit, Ground Revision, and converse with staff and artist in residence, Peter Hoffmeister.
Sponsored by a Humanities New York Vision Grant

Monthly Curator Tours of “Home Plate” at Morris Jumel Mansion

Join exhibition curator, Neil Scherer of Going, Going, Gone Sports on a one-hour specialized tour of the exhibition, “Home Plate,” which features iconic moments from the Polo Grounds stadium.

Since its construction in 1765, the Morris-Jumel Mansion has witnessed countless changes to the property and built environment. The original estate stretched from the Hudson to Harlem Rivers before being sold in parcels at various points throughout the 19th century and incorporated in the city grid. In 1890, the third incarnation of the Polo Grounds rose within the gaze of the Mansion on former riverfront property where the Morris’ and Jumels’ harvested oysters.

The iconic bathtub shaped stadium at the Polo Grounds served as home to the New York Giants baseball team from 1891-1957, the New York Yankees from 1913-22, the New York Giants football team from 1925-55, New York Mets from 1962-1963, as well as other professional teams and athletic events. This property, which lies east of the Mansion, just below Coogan’s Bluff, lays claim to some of the most exciting moments in American sports history. The exhibition will explore and celebrate those teams, players, and personalities that solidified the stadium as a New York icon and famed venue where local and national heroes cemented their reputations and legacies.

Included in the exhibition are extraordinarily rare autographs, tickets, photos, programs, and other ephemera that serves to commemorate the ghosts of this legendary New York athletic pantheon.

$15/$10 Museum Members.

Open House New York at Dyckman Farmhouse

Open House New York provides broad audiences with unparalleled access to the extraordinary architecture of New York and to the people who help design, build, and preserve the city. There will be a docent lead tour on the history of the Farmhouse and the neighborhood.
Open House New York brinda a un público
amplio un acceso inigualable a la extraordinaria arquitectura de Nueva York y a las personas que ayudan a diseñar, construir y preservar la ciudad. Habrá una visita guiada por la historia de la
granja y el vecindario.